moog subharmonicon review

moog subharmonicon review

In truth, this should come as no surprise. I reviewed the Subharmonicon some weeks before Moog announced it, and it performed faultlessly throughout. Each of these comprises a conventional pitch generator (the fundamental) plus two sub-harmonic generators that produce sounds ranging from the fundamental pitch 'f' down to f/16 (see 'What Are Sub-harmonics?' The Subharmonicon's sound generator has been married to two identical four-step sequencers and, unless patched otherwise, the first of these drives VCO1 while the second drives VCO2. I particularly liked finding a cool looped rhythm on the sequencer, then using the built-in filters to make it sound like it was fading in and out of the distance. I make lists of things to practice on guitar, buy myself music books, listen to inspiring records, and then collapse into Netflix under the weight of it all. Photograph: Moog. The Subharmonicon comes with a quarter-inch instrument output, and a 12 volt power supply plugs into the back. The family includes the Mother 32, the Drummer From Another Mother, the Grandmother, and the Matriarch.But this Mother entry didn’t get a Mom-themed name because it’s a mashup of two legendary synthesizers. Moog Subharmonicon Semi-Modular Polyrhythmic Analog Synthesizer. It works something like this... Each sequencer appears to offer nothing more than four small bipolar pots to adjust the CV generated, plus four LEDs to tell you which step is active at any given moment. Yes there are some drawbacks with the patchbay and yes there is only one voice path for the oscillators, but a lot of the core elements of the synth are available as outputs on the patchbay making it easy to exploit using other modular systems. Photograph: Moog. That said, the concepts that underly the Moog Subharmonicon could be explored in much more expansive and complex structures with NI Reaktor or Cycling 74 MAX/MSP. If you activate just the OSC button, all three partials are affected conventionally and their relationships remain constant. © Terrence O'Brien / Engadget Moog Subharmonicon The Subharmonicon is largely inspired by a pair of early (and kinda bizarre) electronic music … Wired may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. Indeed, if you tune its six partials correctly you can create some huge patches that are highly reminiscent of those obtained from large modular synths with six or more oscillators. The Subharmonicon takes the rhythm-fueled awesomeness of the Rhythmicon, a machine from the 1930s famous for its use dicing up the piano on this Radiohead song, and combines it with the subharmonic richness of the Trautonium, the eerie synth responsible for the evil squawks in Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds. All rights reserved. The WIRED conversation illuminates how technology is changing every aspect of our lives—from culture to business, science to design. I tried all the basic patches recommended by the cardboard overlays Moog sent but didn’t really mess with patching stuff together when making my own sounds. Austrian Audio OC818 Dual Set Plus microphones, Teenage Engineering Pocket Operator Modular, Synthesis Techniques For Emulating Vintage Sounds, Distant City Studios - A Drum Room With A Difference, Mastering Essentials Part 6 - Final Delivery: Requirements & Specs. Lack of presets forces you to get creative. It's easy to describe the LFOs and other modulators on the Subharmonicon because there aren't any. The Moog Subharmonicon is a semi-modular polyrhythmic analog synthesizer that employs a 6-tone sound engine and multi-layered sequencers to explore the world of subharmonics, polyrhythms, and the unique relationships they create. The most powerful tools are the rhythm generators. You might wonder how much use just four steps might be, especially since you can't chain them into an eight-step sequence or use one sequencer to modulate the other to obtain a 16-step sequence, but the Subharmonicon is all about rhythm rather than melody. On the front-facing patch bay, inputs abound. Moog even sent me a companion Mother 32 unit to patch into the Subharmonicon, but I spent most of my time playing them separately. What's more, when used this way the bumps in the internally generated PWM are masked so you can achieve even richer sounds without adverse side effects. I'd expect the Subharmonicon will be approached best as an exploratory, experimental machine. Then there's the way it physically feels to touch. It is the essential source of information and ideas that make sense of a world in constant transformation. Mind you, serendipitous chaos might be your target, in which case go for it! I wish that all manufacturers would provide such a diagram as a matter of course. But that's not what the Subharmonicon is all about (at best it's an hors d'oeuvre before the main course of polyrhythms) and a selection of factory sounds provided in the manual and on overlays provides a good starting point for understanding the sound engine, the sequencers and the patch bay. In the month or so I've had it around my studio, it's the best way I've found to break out of sad folk songs. The commercial Subharmonicon is a big step forward from the version built at Moogfest. However with today's announcement we are seeing a new final release version which adds some more features to the original version. Its range is 1/3Hz (20bpm) to 50Hz (3000bpm) but, just as the frequencies of the sub-harmonics are determined by f/n, the frequencies of the Rhythms are also determined by f/n where f is now the master clock frequency and n is again an integer from 1 to 16. I'm sure if I owned one of these synths, I'd spend more time trying to learn that part of the instrument, which can be patched together with other modular synths. But I obtained the best and most musical results when I decided beforehand what I was trying to achieve. And although the BFAM synth/sequencer built at the 2016 Moogfest has never reappeared in commercial form, the following year's DFAM was released in 2018 and has since become a firm hit with fans of the unusual. The best knobs on the planet. If you buy something using links in our stories, we may earn a commission. The Moog Subharmicon is great at creating spooky rhythmic synth lines like those you’ll find on Netflix’s Stranger Things. ... 3 Reviews written.

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